Bennett Wagons new home in South Creek, St Marys

Susan Johnson, David Trist & Shirley White from St Marys Historical Society welcome the new pavillion for the iconic Bennett Wagons. Picture: Gary Warrick.
Susan Johnson, David Trist & Shirley White from St Marys Historical Society welcome the new pavillion for the iconic Bennett Wagons. Picture: Gary Warrick.

South Creek Park in St Marys is the new home to not one, but three, Bennett wagons.

Penrith Council has constructed an expanded enclosure at the park to house the three wagons, which are part of the early history of St Marys.

The construction of the pavilions housing the wagons include a three-sided courtyard and an outdoor learning area.

The Bennett Wagons are a symbol of the early manufacturing days of St Marys.

In the mid-1800s, James Bennett and his two sons produced wagons for the horse-drawn transportation of wheat and wool; their wagons were sold across the colony and transported by rail from the St Marys Goods Yard.

St Marys District Historical Society welcomed the news.

Secretary Norma Thorburn said the pavilion was a great space for hosting tours.

Bennett Wagon. Picture: Gary Warrick.

Bennett Wagon. Picture: Gary Warrick.

"They were such icons and were probably one of the most important things to happen for St Marys," Mrs Thorburn said.

"They put St Marys on the map and had the world record for the largest load in 1920."

Penrith mayor Ross Fowler said the site reflected the historical significance of the wagons' manufacture.

"We will be able to display more of our history and create an area for future generations to learn about the early days of St Marys," Councillor Fowler told the Star.

"Part of that history is the role St Marys Rotary played in restoring the wagons as a permanent memorial to the pioneers of St Marys district."

Cr Fowler said William Waterhouse donated the Bennett Wagons to St Marys Rotary Club.

The members renovated them and then donated them to the council.

The Bennett Wagons are famous in Australia's agricultural industry.

"The project will provide new learning opportunities for students, residents and visitors to connect with our past," he said.

The pavilions are made with recycled material that may have otherwise ended up in landfill.