Press release: Susan Day

A major rethink is needed to address the ongoing shortage of car parking spaces in Penrith, according to Sue Day, Candidate for South Ward.

Sue Day believes that the current parking situation is a classic game of “catch-up” with the losers being local residents.

“What we have now is a situation where demand cannot keep up with supply. The recent net gain of 250 car parking spaces will diminish over the next 12 months unless there is a planning rethink.

“The development of Glenmore Ridge has provided an addition of 530 homes, plus the further 100 new residences in Jordan Springs will mean local parking will be under greater pressure” the South Ward candidate said.

Sue Day has been meeting with local residents who have told her that the lack of parking impacts on local workers, businesses and shopping.

Local resident Chris Foster finds it very difficult to find long term parking around the Penrith CBD. Working part time in Penrith Plaza means her choices are limited.

“Being a part time employee I can’t afford the daily rate that is charged to park in Penrith Plaza” Ms Forster said.

Sue Day believes that a solution may not mean a great expenditure of Council funds but a “think outside the square” strategy.

“Penrith has three major streams of traffic heading towards the Penrith CBD. Firstly, the daily rail commuters take the prime positions, then local employees take what’s left of the long-term parking. It doesn’t leave many spaces for part-time workers let alone customers of the small businesses in and around Penrith.

“One way to take off the pressure is to identify peripheral parking areas that can be serviced by a 10 minute shuttle buses during peak times, as well as express bus services from outlying suburbs.

“Also, providing subsidised parking bays for local employers who would be more than happy to pay for their employees.

“Any income derived from subsidised parking schemes could then be put towards improving parking and local transport systems. This will improve investment in Penrith through an increase in local shopping.

“The parking problem won’t go away. We need to rethink how we plan parking” Sue Day said.

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